Our Publications

The Tłįchǫ Research & Training Institute of the  Department of Culture and Lands Protection of the Tłįchǫ Government is pleased to announce our publishing program for 2014.  Two series of Tłįchǫ Traditional Knowledge Reports will be printed in limited quantities and distributed to offices and schools within our region, as well as to interested organizations. These publications will also be made available on-line and will be downloadable  at this site.

This Reports series is an important initiative of the Tłįchǫ Research & Training Institute to bring together and make easily accessible valuable studies based on Tłįchǫ traditional knowledge, and land use.

 

 

Current Publications and Reprints

Release date:
February, 2017
Publication type:
General Interest

This report explores the importance of birthplaces through an ethno-historical mapping project. For this project, four elders shared their stories about birthplaces and childbirth practices, in addition to mapping a number of birthplaces on Tłıc̨hǫ lands. These places and the elder’s stories illuminate the importance of learning about birthplaces and listening to their words so that younger generations may carry on the Tłıc̨hǫ way of life.

February, 2017 Researcher: Georgina Chocolate Report Authors and Principle Investigators: Rachel Olson and Janelle Kuntz GIS and Report Design: The Firelight Group   This project was funded by The Firelight Group’s Social Return initiative. 
Release date:
April, 2016
Publication type:
General Interest

This traditional knowledge study is part of the Tłįchǫ Government’s strategy to gather information about the potential benefits and concerns that might arise from a proposed all-season road from Highway 3 to the Tłįchǫ community of Whatì. The purpose of the study is to inform decision-makers and developers about the areas of importance for the practice of cultural activities on the land surrounding the proposed road route, and to identify what impacts the proposed road will have on harvesters, and on the land and animals. 

October, 2014

Researcher: Georgina Chocolate GIS coordinator: Sjoerd van der Vielen Principal Investigator: Petter Jacobsen
Release date:
December, 2015
The overall objective of the Rayrock project is to show that people who actively harvest renewable resources in an area are the best people to monitor changes to the environment in that area. They know the land and its interrelated parts. They understand the behaviour  and physical makeup of the wildlife that inhabit the area. Report prepared by Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee, Dogrib Treaty 11 Council for the Arctic Environmental Strategy, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development

March 1997

Research team: Allice Legat, Principle Investigator Joan Ryan, Assistant Analyst Sally Ann Zoe, Researcher Marie Adele Rabesca, Researcher Madeleine Chocolate, Translator December 2015: re‐published by Tłı̨chǫ Knowledge Research and Monitoring Program, with spelling updates for Tłı̨chǫ (Dogrib) terms

ISBN: 978‐1‐896790‐52‐7

Release date:
February, 2016

Cumulative Impacts Study on the Bathurst Caribou

This study is based on the traditional knowledge (TK) of the people in Wekweètì, Northwest Territories. It investigates the connection between Tłıc̨ hǫ and the Bathurst caribou from three perspectives: 1) the importance of caribou in the hunting economy, and thus as a foundation for maintaining the Tłıc̨hǫ culture, language and way of life; 2) cumulative impacts on the herd and 3) the connection between ecosystem and culture, and the co-dependent erosion of biological and cultural diversity. Lastly, the report outlines several steps to resolve these issues.

The study was based on the traditional knowledge of the following Tłı̨chǫelders and harvesters: Jimmy Kodzin Noella Kodzin Bobby Pea Joseph Dryneck William Quitte Virginia Lamouelle Bruce Football Roy Judas Johnny Smallgeese Joseph Judas Cathy Dryneck Johnny Boline Julia Bolin Mary Adele Football Robert Mackenzie Philip Dryneck

Researchers: Georgina Chocolate and Rita Wetrade

GIS Technician: Michael Birlea

Principal Investigator and Author: Petter Jacobsen

ISBN Number: 978-1-896790-53-4

Release date:
May, 2015
Publication type:
General Interest

Land use planning is about thinking for the future. It does not dictate how the future will unfold, but instead is a tool for planning for the unknown. The Tłįchǫ Government has prepared the Tłįchǫ Land Use Plan to assist in managing approximately 39,000 km2 of Tłįchǫ lands. The Tłįchǫ Land Use Plan uses maps, policies and written information to manage Tłįchǫ lands, with the goal of protecting Tłįchǫ culture, heritage and a traditional way of life. The Plan provides a guide for future development by outlining how Tłįchǫ land will be protected and how activities and development on Tłįchǫ lands should occur.

Published under the authority of the Tłįchǫ Government, Behchokǫ,  NT, Canada, 2012.

Cover Photos: Tessa Macintosh

ISBN Number: 978-1-896790-47-3

Release date:
January, 2015

The West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society was set up in 1995 to collect environmental and socioeconomic information from the perspective of both science and Aboriginal traditional knowledge. The overall purpose was to gather information to better inform planning decisions and to contribute baseline data to assess and mitigate cumulative effects of development.


Submitted by Whàehdǫǫ̀ Nàowo Kǫ̀ Dogrib Treaty 11 Council

To the West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society - March 2001

Report authors:

Allice Legat, Principle Investigator and Research Director Georgina Chocolate, Community Researcher Madelaine Chocolate, Language Specialist Sally Anne Zoe, GIS Administrator

October 2014: re-published by the Tłįchǫ  Research and Training

Institute, with spelling updates for Tłįchǫ  (Dogrib) terms.

ISBN: 1-896790-50-3

Release date:
January, 2015

The decision to conduct this research came from the elders and the leadership through the Dogrib Renewable Resources Committee2. They wanted to ensure that Tłįchǫ knowledge of ɂekwǫ 3 and their habitat was documented; to provide baseline information, to contribute to monitoring and management initiatives related to caribou and their habitat. 

Submitted to the West Kitikmeot Slave Study Society, March 2001

Authors:

Allice Legat, Principal Investigator and Research Director Georgina Chocolate, Caribou Researcher Bobby Gon, Caribou Researcher Sally Anne Zoe, GIS Administrator Madelaine Chocolate, Language Coordinator October 2014: re-published by the Tłįchǫ Research and Training Institute, with spelling updates for Tłįchǫ (Dogrib) terms.


ISBN: 978-1-896790-51-0

Release date:
June, 2016
Publication type:
Under Development

ISBN:978-1-896790-49-7
Available in early 2015.

Release date:
June, 2016
Publication type:
Under Development

ISBN:  978-1-896790-43-5 pp.254 
Research Team (2001): Mary Adele Rabesca, Diane Romie, Lawrence Nitsiza, Aggie Brockman, Principal Investigator: Joan Ryan

Release date:
June, 2016
Publication type:
Under Development

ISBN: 978-1-896790-44-2 pp.374
Research Team (2001): Mary Adele Rabesca, Diane Romie, Martha Johnson, Principal Investigator:  Joan Ryan